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Humana’s President and CEO Bruce Broussard will discuss health care transformation and innovation at AHIP’s Medicare Conference in Washington, D.C., next week.

He’ll talk about the role health plans play in helping Medicare Advantage (MA) members achieve their best health, as well as offer his thoughts on the future of health care and the importance of integrated care.

He shared some of his thoughts ahead of the event, and you can read that Q&A here.

 

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Humana has been ranked No. 3 on the list of the “Healthiest 100 Workplaces in America,” compiled by Healthiest Employers to honor companies that proactively contribute to the health of employees through the most effective and innovative cultures of well-being.

It’s the second such award in a week for Humana. The company earned Gold status in the American Heart Association’s Workplace Health Achievement Index, placing the company’s comprehensive workplace health efforts among the best in the nation.

The Healthiest 100 is a national ranking determined by a rigorous methodology and weighted across local and national assessments. Scores are based on population health outcomes and six values: vision, culture/engagement, learning, expertise, metrics and technology.

By honoring organizations that proactively help their employees improve their health, the awards highlight best practices and provide valuable insight into managing population health.

“We’re proud to receive this recognition because it reflects all the hard work our associates have done together in improving their well-being,” said Tim Huval, Humana Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer. “Tending to our own lives helps us understand and empathize with our members as they strive toward their own best health. By increasing the number of healthy days and lowering stress in our own population, we can lead by example and create healthier environments for our customers.”

Read the full press release here.

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Since Hurricane Irma ravaged Florida, leaving a widespread path of destruction across the state, Feeding America has been working diligently with its partner food banks to meet the critical food needs of Floridians affected by the storm. Humana recognizes Feeding America for its rapid response in this difficult time.

To assist with this important effort, the Humana Foundation, the philanthropic arm of health and well-being company Humana, contributed $100,000 that was distributed to Feeding America partners in South Florida, Tampa Bay and Northeast Florida. Feeding America is using these funds to supply critical items such as water, produce, snack foods, ready-to-eat products, personal hygiene items and cleaning supplies.

Food insecurity is already a serious health concern throughout much of Florida, and the problem is magnified after a disaster such as a hurricane.

Feeding America is a nationwide network of 200 food banks in the United States, providing food to more than 46 million people through 60,000 food pantries and meal programs in communities across America.

Feeding South Florida’s Distribution Coordinator Delmer Swab, with the help of The 53rd Infantry Brigade of the United States Army, loads pallets of water, ready-to-eat meals, snacks, and medical supplies for delivery to shelters in Miami-Dade County.
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Recognizing the severe toll Hurricane Maria has taken on Puerto Rico communities already distressed following Hurricane Irma, Humana has initiated a series of disaster relief efforts to assist its members, employees and Puerto Rico communities.

In addition, the Humana Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Humana, announced it will provide a $250,000 immediate grant to the American Red Cross to help the nonprofit organization deliver vital services, including food, shelter and related disaster relief, to Puerto Ricans affected by Hurricanes Maria and Irma.

“It’s important to Humana that our employees, health plan members and the people of Puerto Rico know we are concerned for their health and well-being,” said Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard. “We cannot underestimate the long-term toll of multiple severe storms like Maria and Irma, and we are delegating resources and putting in place measures to help people during the recovery period.”

Among those measures, Humana has opened its toll-free crisis intervention hotline and counseling services beyond employees and members to include any individual who may need assistance in areas impacted by Maria and Irma. Counselors and work/life specialists are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-866-440-6556 to provide free, confidential assistance to anyone needing help and support in coping with the disaster and its aftermath. Assistance is available in both English and Spanish.

Humana has also taken these additional steps:

  • For all affected members, Humana has suspended referrals and prior authorization requirements for acute, post-acute, outpatient and physician services
  • Humana is providing affected members who need to seek care out-of-network in Puerto Rico with the same benefits they would get from an in-network health care provider or facility
  • Humana health plan members in affected areas who have prescription coverage can obtain early refills of their medications without authorization from their physicians or Humana

“We recognize the severe impact that the recent hurricanes have had on so many fellow Puerto Ricans, including our members, employees, health care provider partners, brokers and employer clients, who are in need of our resources and support,” said Earl Harper, regional president of Medicare for Humana in Puerto Rico. “We want them to know that we will work tirelessly to support them at this critical time.”

Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico as a Category 4 storm, leaving widespread destruction and knocking out power to most of the island, which was still reeling from damage and power outages caused by Hurricane Irma earlier this month.

The American Red Cross, recipient of the Humana Foundation donation, is one of the organizations already mobilizing to offer disaster relief in Puerto Rico.

“We know there is much to be done to help Puerto Rico recover from these storms, and we hope this donation from the Humana Foundation will help provide quick relief to the people there,” said interim Humana Foundation Executive Director Pattie Dale Tye. “Our hearts go out to the island residents who have endured so much in recent days.”

Humana Medicare and commercial members with questions about services available to them should call the toll-free phone number on the back of their Humana ID card.

About the Humana Foundation

The Humana Foundation was established in 1981 as the philanthropic arm of Humana Inc., one of the nation’s leading health and well-being companies. Located in Louisville, Ky., the Foundation seeks to improve community health and well-being through support of nonprofit partners that promote healthy behaviors, health education, and access to health services. For more information, visit www.humanafoundation.org.

Humana and the Humana Foundation are dedicated to Corporate Social Responsibility. Our goal is to ensure that every business decision we make reflects our commitment to improving the health and well-being of our members, our associates, the communities we serve, and our planet.

About Humana

Humana Inc. is committed to helping our millions of medical and specialty members achieve their best health. Our successful history in care delivery and health plan administration is helping us create a new kind of integrated care with the power to improve health and well-being and lower costs. Our efforts are leading to a better quality of life for people with Medicare, families, individuals, military service personnel, and communities at large.

To accomplish that, we support physicians and other health care professionals as they work to deliver the right care in the right place for their patients, our members. Our range of clinical capabilities, resources and tools – such as in-home care, behavioral health, pharmacy services, data analytics and wellness solutions – combine to produce a simplified experience that makes health care easier to navigate and more effective.

More information regarding Humana is available to investors via the Investor Relations page of the company’s website at www.humana.com, including copies of:
Annual reports to stockholders
Securities and Exchange Commission filings
Most recent investor conference presentations
Quarterly earnings news releases and conference calls
Calendar of events
Corporate Governance information

Contact:

Humana Corporate Communications
Sandra Estada, 787-697-6345
sestada@humana.com

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The most highly rated TV programs feature frequent ageist language and under-representation of seniors and could have impacts on health, according to research from an ongoing partnership between Humana and the Media, Diversity & Social Change Initiative at University of Southern California’s (USC) Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Led by Stacy L. Smith, Ph.D., USC’s study analyzed 1,609 speaking characters in the most popular Nielsen-rated television shows that aired between June 1, 2016, and May 31, 2017, to determine how characters aged 60 and over are portrayed. In tandem, Humana conducted a quantitative survey of people aged 60 and over to explore their thoughts on aging, specifically to understand which attributes are directly linked to better health.

Both studies examined ageism, and the results indicate that it potentially has a negative impact not only on optimism, self-esteem and confidence, but also the physical and mental health of aging Americans.

The research also finds that among seniors who experience frequent ageism, optimists have far fewer unhealthy days, regardless of the amount of ageism they experience. This suggests one way to combat the negative impact of ageism is to be more optimistic.

A deeper analysis of the findings revealed:

Even in the highest-rated television programs, aging characters are underrepresented and stereotypically portrayed.

  • Only 9.4 percent of all speaking characters were 60 years of age or over – despite seniors representing 19.9 percent of the U.S. population, according to the 2015 U.S. Census.
  • Stereotypical, ageist language is prevalent in the shows. Some choice quotes include: “Things just sound creepier when you’re old,” and “You like the color? It’s called ‘ancient ivory,’ like you.”
  • Of shows featuring a main senior character, 41 percent contained one or more ageist comments. Of those series with ageist comments, 62.5 percent had remarks that came from characters speaking to a senior, while 68.8 percent contained self-deprecating dialogue delivered by seniors to themselves.
  • Shows without a writer or showrunner age 60 or over were more likely to feature ageism than shows with a writer or showrunner age 60 or over.

There are inherent consequences to these stereotyped portrayals of aging Americans – including a potentially negative impact on seniors’ sense of self-esteem, confidence and optimism, as well as their health.

  • Seniors who experience ageism once a week or more report having 4.6 more physically unhealthy days and 5.4 more mentally unhealthy days per month than respondents who rarely or never report experiencing ageism.
  • Seniors who experience ageism once a week or more reported that it had a moderately negative impact on their sense of self-esteem, confidence and optimism, scoring the impact of ageism on their self-esteem at nearly 6 on a 10-point scale.

Aging Americans who describe themselves as optimists feel better about their overall health and well-being, underscoring the importance of an optimistic mindset for healthy aging.

  • Among seniors who report experiencing frequent ageism (once a week or more), optimists have, on average, 4 fewer physical and 3 fewer mental unhealthy days each month.
  • And, of all survey respondents, those who rate themselves as most optimistic feel on average 12.5 years younger than their actual age.

“We’ve studied this in film, but the lack of senior representation and prevalence of ageism on the small screen counters the idea that TV is better than film,” said Stacy L. Smith, director of the Media, Diversity & Social Change Initiative at USC’s Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism. “There’s obviously more work to be done in the entertainment industry—seniors are often left out of the conversation on inclusion. This study speaks to the need for increasing older storytellers behind the camera who can create more authentic senior characters on-screen.”

Dr. Yolangel Hernandez Suarez, vice president and chief medical officer of care delivery at Humana, added: “Understanding the social determinants of health is a key priority for Humana. That’s why we’re committed to advancing societal perceptions and promoting aging with optimism. Our survey and continued partnership with the University of Southern California demonstrate the power of an optimistic mindset for combating ageism and embracing healthy aging.”

Both Stacy L. Smith and Dr. Yolangel Hernandez Suarez will provide more insight on each respective study as panelists at The Atlantic Live! New Old Age conference in New York City, slated for October 2017.

Read the full news release here.

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