Bruce Broussard

Bruce BroussardIn a series of LinkedIn Influencer blog posts, Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard shares insights and ideas about the future of health care and discusses the importance of working together to improve the health-care system as well as our own health and well-being. His latest — Is a Positive Nudge Better than Fear? — is reprinted below. To see all of his blog posts, click here.

Fear is used to influence how we behave, how we shop, how we save, what we eat, how much we exercise. From purchasing the safest car to baby-proofing our homes, fear drives us in many ways.

But is fear effective in health? Yes, people will lose weight because they’re afraid of having a heart attack. Yet others will lose weight because they want to have more energy to do the things they love and have a longer, more fulfilling life. When it comes to changing behaviors, is fear the best motivator?

In health care, our ability to change unhealthy behaviors – and thus improve outcomes and lower costs – will determine the sustainability of the system. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “86 percent of the nation’s $2.7 trillion annual health care expenditures are for people with chronic and mental health conditions.”

Chronic conditions are the most preventable of health issues because they’re the result of unhealthy decisions made over time. This leads to a question: How do you “nudge” people toward positive behavior change?

I recently finished the revised and expanded edition of a book called Nudge, by Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein. The authors offer several insights on how unhealthy behaviors can be corrected.

Here are four concepts from the book that grabbed my attention and how each can be used to change unhealthy behaviors among seniors and those living with multiple chronic conditions:

#1: Frame the choice without the negative. Thaler and Sunstein examine how a person with a serious heart disease is presented with a “grueling operation.” They state the following:

“The doctor says, ‘of one hundred patients who have this operation, ninety are alive after five years.’ What will you do? If we fill in the facts in a certain way, the doctor’s statement will be pretty comforting, and you’ll probably have the operation. But suppose the doctor frames his answer in a somewhat different way…‘Of one hundred patients who have this operation, ten are dead after five years.’” Thaler and Sunstein go on to say, “If you’re like most people, the doctor’s statement will sound pretty alarming, and you might not have the operation.” The same goes for doctors themselves. “When doctors are told that ‘ninety of one hundred are alive,’ they are more likely to recommend the operation than if told that ‘ten of one hundred are dead.’”

The Nudge: Physicians, nurses, care professionals and caregivers who care for seniors living with multiple chronic conditions have much influence. It’s natural for a senior not to want to undergo an operation where there is risk. Thaler and Sunstein note that “a good way to increase people’s fear of a bad outcome is to remind them of a related incident in which things went wrong; a good way to increase people’s confidence is to remind them of a similar situation in which everything worked out for the best.” Nudges that frame the positives, while highlighting the ideal outcome, will help people take steps to evolve from unhealthy behaviors.

#2: Don’t underestimate the power of priming. Referred to by the authors as “the somewhat mysterious workings of the Automatic System of the brain,” the concept has been proven to show that “subtle influences can increase the ease with which certain information comes to mind.” The authors write:

“With respect to health-related behavior, significant changes have been produced by measuring people’s intentions. If people are asked how often they expect to floss their teeth in the next week, they floss more. If people are asked whether they intend to consume fatty foods in the next week, they consume less in the way of fatty foods. The nudge provided by asking people what they intend to do can be accentuated by asking them when and how they plan to do it.”

The Nudge: Consistent patient engagement is essential, especially when focused on sustaining behavior change. Physicians don’t have a lot of time outside the office for helping patients make better daily decisions. But by nudging the patient, the care team shows an active interest in the patient’s health and can improve outcomes.

#3: Incentives are a better option than talking down to someone. Thaler and Sunstein describe how a simple nudge can lower the teen pregnancy rate, saying teenage mothers “often become pregnant again within a year or two.”

The two cite a “dollar a day” program, “by which teenage girls with a baby receive a dollar for each day in which they are not pregnant…A dollar a day is a trivial cost to the city, even for a year or two, so the plan’s total cost is extremely low, but the small recurring payment is salient enough to encourage teenage mothers to take steps to avoid getting pregnant again. And because taxpayers end up paying a significant amount for many children born to teenagers, the costs appear to be far less than the benefits.”

The Nudge: Sustaining action requires sustained commitment. For seniors living with chronic diseases like Congestive Heart Failure, where the heart weakens over time, life is already difficult. Positive encouragement, through nudging from the care teams, can help them stay the course.

#4: People can make good decisions when presented with non-biased facts. In the bonus chapter, Thaler and Sunstein discuss how New York City adopted a law requiring fast-food chains to display the caloric intake of each of their foods. The authors applaud the preference of mandating information vs. mandating ingredients.

The Nudge: Many of us have experienced this nudge by reading the information in fast-food restaurants. It’s a powerful influence because it doesn’t pass judgment on an option; it merely states the impact of the decision. Making someone feel guilty for his or her unhealthy decisions over a lifetime won’t change behavior.

For far too long, health in our country has been marketed through fear. Given how unhealthy our country has become, it’s time for a change.

Health is hard, especially for seniors living with multiple chronic conditions, limited financial means, and often limited support from family and friends. We have to avoid talking down to people and painting dire scenarios.

At Humana, we’re responsible for the health and well-being of 14 million Americans; 3.3 million of them are Medicare Advantage members, and many of them are living with chronic conditions. I’ve seen firsthand how a nudge – not fear – from a physician, nurse or other care team member can help a person change behavior for the better.

Let’s build a healthier country with helpful nudges, not fear.

Read Full Article

Bruce BroussardIn a series of LinkedIn Influencer blog posts, Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard shares insights and ideas about the future of health care and discusses the importance of working together to improve the health-care system as well as our own health and well-being. His latest — 5 Lessons from Davos — is reprinted below. To see all of his blog posts, click here.

To help my company reach its bold goal – to help the communities we serve be 20 percent healthier by 2020 because we make it easy for people to achieve their best health – I spend a great deal of time in these communities. I want a localized, firsthand understanding of the best practices that my company can take to address and solve health challenges.

I’m an avid reader and a strong believer in lifelong learning. I also think leaders should look for new venues to gain perspective from those outside their immediate circles but facing similar obstacles. That’s what led me to Davos, Switzerland, last week for the World Economic Forum (WEF).

At WEF, I connected with a wide variety of leaders in government and business from around the world. I participated in a panel – “The New Health Paradigm” – where I discussed addressing chronic disease progression and how the value-based payment model can support the member experience. As a member of WEF’s Health and Healthcare Governors Community, I also spoke about my company’s role in its Atlanta Heart Failure Pilot program, which is designed to improve how congestive heart failure is treated in the Atlanta region.

Listed below are some of my lessons learned and takeaways from Davos:

1. We have many reasons to be optimistic about 2018. It was uplifting to see how leaders from a wide variety of industries are making, or planning to make, strategic investments. For example, a recent survey by PwC found that “for the first time since we began asking the question in 2012, the majority of CEOs surveyed believe global economic growth will ‘improve.’ In fact, the percentage of CEOs predicting ‘improved’ growth doubled from last year.”

My takeaway: It’s an exciting time to be driving change in health care. The euphoria can be scary, because it raises expectations. But the biggest risk is taking no risk at all.

2. Technology is rapidly disrupting industries, even as the world tries to coexist with technology. From social media giants dealing with fake news, to the auto industry being disrupted by self-driving cars, companies are dealing with challenges that will reshape how they operate. Technologies like artificial intelligence (AI) will reshape the world and force companies to cross boundaries that they have not previously considered.

My takeaway: Be prepared to disrupt your company before someone, or some entity, does it to you. AI is going to change the way work is done, and we must help people learn new skills to adapt to this new normal.

3. Balance capital returns with sustainability. I had numerous conversations about the letter that BlackRock CEO Larry Fink sent to CEOs a week before the conference. In his letter, Fink wrote that “society is demanding that companies, both public and private, serve a social purpose. To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society. Companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.”

My takeaway: You don’t have to be a CEO to understand that social purpose is critical to long-term sustainability for any company. In a 21st century environment, all of the core audiences must benefit in order to balance capital returns with sustainability.

4. Davos is a unique place that draws a diverse group of people and cultures. I struck up a conversation at dinner one night with a diplomat from Oman who had been coming to Davos for 25 years. He had a fascinating story: his parents were killed when he was 5 years old, he spent the next 15 years in an orphanage, and he went on to be a fisherman in Alaska. After attending the University of Michigan, he made his way to Oman. During our chat, I thought about how Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s keynote highlighted how Davos is one of those unique places that brings a diverse group of people together to work on issues that have world, business and social consequences.

My takeaway: Davos helped me see the resiliency and the passion that attendees have for solving the world’s social, business and political problems. At an event like this, you can see problems through others’ eyes. If we’re going to unite to solve the world’s problems, forums like Davos – which thrive on diversity and perspective – must become more frequent.

5. Health care has an exciting future, but technology will only take it so far. It was enlightening to see the passion that leaders from across the world harbor for building a healthier world using technology. Establishing standards in data exchange will help facilitate the widespread deployment of easy-to-access electronic medical records. And telemedicine might vastly improve health in India, where care is not easily accessible.

My takeaway: We all welcome technology that improves care, but the decades-old fee-for-service system that creates billions in waste must end. Payment reforms like value-based care – which reward physicians and clinicians for the health of the patients they serve, not the number of services they provide – will be a key element in this transformation.

While Davos is the premier gathering of world leaders, it is only four days out of the year. It’s up to us to keep the momentum and excitement going – in research labs, in boardrooms, in schools and other venues.

Leaders must channel the power of optimism to build a purpose-driven business strategy, one with long-term sustainability that goes beyond the profit model.

Read Full Article

As the world’s population ages, and chronic conditions become epidemic, healthcare leaders around the world “must shift from reactive, episodic care to managing health holistically, where the focus is helping people change their lifestyles so they can live healthier lives,” Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard wrote in a World Economic Forum blog post.

Bruce’s blog, in advance of this year’s World Economic Forum Annual Meeting, noted that for decades health professionals have reacted to health problems, rather than addressing their causes.

“America’s costly, fragmented healthcare system, known for isolating and confusing people, is not sustainable in managing a growing population of ageing people living with chronic conditions,” he wrote.

“But it’s not just a US problem. The global population of the oldest seniors, 80 years of age or older, is expected to triple, to 446.6 million people, by 2050. Combined with the 50% of the world’s population that lives with chronic diseases today, this will certainly challenge healthcare systems around the world.

“Healthcare leaders worldwide must shift from reactive, episodic care to managing health holistically, where the focus is helping people change their lifestyles so they can live healthier lives.”

He offered suggestions to hasten change, from addressing the social determinants of health, to moving toward value-based care, to adopting interoperable workflows and systems. Together, such initiatives can slow chronic disease progression across the world.

Read the entire blog entry here.

Read Full Article

Bruce BroussardIn a series of LinkedIn Influencer blog posts, Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard shares insights and ideas about the future of health care and discusses the importance of working together to improve the health-care system as well as our own health and well-being. His latest — How seniors can beat “diseases” like loneliness and social isolation — is reprinted below. To see all of his blog posts, click here.

Tivity Health, Inc. (NASQ: TVTY) Chief Executive Officer Donato J. Tramuto and I recently teamed up to draft the following blog post.

Health is personal. You might tell yourself that you alone have the power to make the lifestyle changes to eat better, exercise or meditate.

But getting healthy doesn’t have to be a solo act, because many of us face the same challenges. Individual resolve is important, but momentum is best maintained when we have a friend to encourage us to stay the course.

For many of us with active lives, it’s easy to find people like ourselves, whether it’s at work or through a social activity. But if you’re a senior who is lonely or socially isolated, it’s not easy to find encouragement and change your health.

Seniors face many health challenges that are not just medical

American seniors face significant health challenges. Many of them are living with multiple chronic conditions they may have for the rest of their lives, from diabetes to congestive heart failure. They may be on a fixed income, struggling to pay for prescription drugs.

Despite these challenges, there is also positive momentum in aging. Advances in science are helping America’s seniors live longer and stay active. For example, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention say life expectancy in the U.S. is 78.8 years, and that could rise.

While seniors are living longer, there are other issues that can affect their health. For example, take the impact of loneliness on seniors. One study found that “loneliness has an equivalent risk factor to health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, shortening one’s lifespan by eight years.” Research has also shown that social isolation can limit a senior’s ability to improve their health. For example, “6 million adults 65 and older have a disability that prevents them from leaving their homes without help.”

Living with chronic conditions is hard enough. When a senior does not have a support network of friends and family – people to socialize with and share common interests – the will to improve one’s health can be compromised.

As the leaders of Humana and Tivity Health, we’ve had decades of experience helping the senior community. We’ve found that the secret to improving their health is simplicity. It starts by offering them a platform to engage in activities that not only make them healthier, but help them connect with others.

Bringing people together helps improve health

At Humana, we’re helping more than 3.3 million Medicare Advantage members nationwide age with optimism, an approach that goes beyond conventional clinical treatments. Many of our members are living with chronic conditions, but they are more active than previous generations. For Tivity Health, which manages SilverSneakers®, we’re helping millions of people age into Medicare.

Our experience has taught us that social engagement leads to sustainable change. SilverSneakers® memberships, available through countless Medicare Advantage programs, give seniors access to a nationwide network of physical locations, as well as community centers, parks and social locations, where they can meet other people and engage in fitness classes specifically designed for their demographic. One survey found that “49% of active members said they were motivated to continue exercising because they had a friend in the program.”

And it’s more than just walking. SilverSneakers offers a wide variety of exercises and intensity levels, from dance classes to yoga sessions, as well as conventional cardio and weight-focused classes. SilverSneakers has entered into partnerships with more than 14,000 fitness locations nationwide as well as at Humana Guidance Centers. At Humana, SilverSneakers is included at no additional cost to the 3.3 million Humana MA members across the country.

SilverSneakers is a key element of many Humana Medicare Advantage plans because the proactive program takes a holistic approach to capture the senior’s complete health, not just the clinical.

In MA, we take a coordinated care approach, working side-by-side with providers who are in value-based reimbursement models with Humana. That means these providers are reimbursed for the health outcomes of our members (their patients), not just the services they provide. Programs like SilverSneakers perfectly align with the health-focused nature of Medicare Advantage.

Let’s learn from common purpose

The resolve to improve one’s health starts from within, but success requires perseverance and encouragement from friends and others who share the goals. Today, millions of seniors are not getting that support because they are socially isolated or lonely, and this has had a significant impact on their health.

Helping these seniors improve their health and well-being does not always have to start with a prescription or a visit to the doctor. Platforms such as SilverSneakers, supported through Medicare Advantage programs that emphasize health outcomes, can give seniors the social support they need and connect them with others who share a common purpose. This camaraderie ensures that seniors are not alone in their health journey.

Read Full Article

Bruce BroussardIn a series of LinkedIn Influencer blog posts, Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard shares insights and ideas about the future of health care and discusses the importance of working together to improve the health-care system as well as our own health and well-being. His latest — Who are the forgotten soldiers of health care? — is reprinted below. To see all of his blog posts, click here.

If I were to ask you about the forgotten soldiers of health care, you might think about hard-working nurses and clinicians, or the ER staff that works diligently through the night. While these professions are absolutely critical to our nation’s health care system, my thoughts go closer to home, to family.

Think about how difficult it is to care for someone who is over 65 and needs assistance at home. Whether it’s managing multiple medications or monitoring blood-sugar levels, in-home care for an older person living with chronic conditions takes a team approach.

Primary care physicians can quarterback care and coordinate among specialists, and nurses can make sure care is efficient and consistent.

But beyond the traditional doctor/patient relationship, there is a forgotten soldier. This person is not a doctor or a nurse or a licensed care professional. Many times the person does not work in the health care industry. But they have the most unbreakable bond with the patient: They are family. That person is the caregiver.

And this was reinforced for me during a recent visit to Houston.

Meet “George”

While I was in Houston, I was fortunate enough to participate in an in-home visit with one of our members, “George.” I also met his wife, “Mary,” their daughter, “Beth,” and several members of George’s clinical team.

George is 71 years old and is in a Medicare Advantage PPO plan. He lives with multiple chronic conditions, including coronary artery disease and hypertension, and he has undergone a coronary artery bypass.

Living with these multiple chronic conditions is not easy for George, and it also takes a toll on Mary and Beth. Treating these conditions requires a holistic approach.

For example, Humana and our partners — physicians, nurses and clinical care experts — help care for George in a number of ways. He receives occupational therapy to strengthen his upper extremities and fine motor muscles, and physical therapy, primarily for his lower extremities and gross motor muscles. Under the direction of a care professional, George also receives support for personal care and activities of daily living, like feeding, showering, dressing, etc.

The Sit Down

Both George’s nurse and his therapist led the visit. His wife and daughter were there, too.

From the start, it was evident that the nurse and therapist had a strong, personal bond with George, Mary and Beth. The nurse and therapist, both of whom I could see were an unofficial extension of the family, understood the critical care and emotional support that Mary and Beth provided to George.

At the end of the 30-minute visit, I asked George what was most important about the care he received. He said he appreciated help from people with a positive attitude; he liked the quality of the interaction and not being “rushed;” and he noted the dependability of the team members, who always show up and follow through.

The care team benefitted too, enhancing their already deep, holistic understanding of George and reinforcing the bond of trust. It was clear to me that this care team – family and clinical – had been making a difference in George’s life, and that he was thankful.

The Importance of Caregivers

November is National Family Caregivers Month, a time to recognize the critical care provided by approximately 43.5 million caregivers. Their work had an estimated economic value of $470 billion in unpaid services in 2013. And with the senior population growing, many of us are going to find ourselves in the shoes of Mary and Beth – as caregivers.

These forgotten soldiers of health care will help determine how well America copes with the rising tide of chronic conditions. I’m encouraged, having seen firsthand how Humana’s Caregivers Network Resource Group is providing resources for our employees caring for family members and other loved ones.

While George has a very strong clinical team and family support network, there are many members who are not as fortunate. They are socially isolated and don’t have family to turn to for care. Their children may live in different cities. They might not have close relatives or friends.

This is the challenge, and we must be prepared.

It’s only going to become more common

In the caregiving world, relationships matter. Technology can help, maybe by building caregiver networks to identify people who have the time to help. But it’s not going to change health.

Technology is not a substitute for trust between two people. Basic human interactions can’t be replaced with a robot, an app or some other form of technology. It’s the low-tech and human efforts that are most impactful.

Our front-line associates know they can have an impact on the health, well-being and experience of our members. They are in this together, and they know it takes a team built on trust, empathy and emotion to make life better.

Mary and Beth are the unsung heroes, the forgotten soldiers of health care. They have an amazing impact on the people they care for, and on our health care system. You may also get the call – as a wife, daughter, husband or son – to be a caregiver. We need to ensure that we’re all prepared to receive this call, and to act on it.


Read Full Article