corporate social responsibility

Humana has dedicated itself to making business decisions that improve the health and well-being of members, employees, the communities it serves, and the planet. For employees, there’s a tour that has stopped in Humana work locations around the country. The Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Roadshow shows employees how they can incorporate social responsibility into their everyday jobs and support Humana’s Healthy People, Healthy Planet and Healthy Performance CSR efforts.

CSR has a positive impact on the community as well as the business. “Having a purpose” helps companies achieve approximately 10 percent more growth than companies that don’t.

Humana’s employees contribute to its CSR efforts in a multitude of ways. Small daily decisions such as taking a walk break or turning off computer monitors when leaving the office can have a big impact.

During the tour to Cincinnati, Ohio; Green Bay, Wisconsin; New Orleans, Louisiana; Phoenix, Arizona; San Antonio, Texas; and Tampa Bay and Miami, Florida, employees were also able to do something good for their health and the health of the local community – pushups*. By learning more about Humana’s Healthy People efforts and completing a few easy exercises, employees funded $17,500 in local food bank donations. Each exercise earned $1 (up to a $2,500) to fight local food insecurity in Humana communities.

The competition among locations has been healthy, too:

  • Cincinnati employees completed 2,522 exercises funding a $2,500 donation the Shared Harvest Food Bank.
  • Miami employees completed 2,540 exercises funding a $2,500 donation to Feeding South Florida.
  • Employees in Green Bay completed 2,618 exercises funding a $2,500 donation to Feeding America Eastern Wisconsin.
  • Tampa employees completed 2,640 exercises to fund a $2,500 donation to Feeding Tampa Bay
  • New Orleans employees completed 4,135 pushups, which funded a $2,500 donation to Second Harvest Food Bank.
  • In Phoenix, employees did 7,059 pushups over two days, funding a $2,500 donation to St. Vincent de Paul Food Bank.
  • In San Antonio, employees completed a staggering 10,950 exercises, funding a $2,500 donation to San Antonio Food Bank.

The CSR tour will wrap-up in Louisville on December 13 and 14. Local employees will be exercising to fund a donation to  Dare to Care Food Bank.

Learn more about Humana’s corporate social responsibility efforts.

*Traditional pushups, modified pushups, exercise band reps, and squats – whatever got employees moving counted.

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Food insecurity – a situation in which households lack access to enough nutritious food for a healthy, active life – has a significant impact on the health of many Americans.Across the nation, one in eight households (12.3 percent) is food insecure.

As part of its Bold Goal population health strategy, Humana is focused on addressing social determinants of health such as food insecurity and loneliness/social isolation. That’s why they partnered with Feeding America, the largest domestic hunger-relief charity in the United States, to develop a toolkit to help health care professionals diagnose and address food insecurity in their patients.

“Our research shows that food insecurity is strongly tied to poor health outcomes, so it is vital that physician practices begin to address food insecurity in their patient populations in order to help patients best manage their health,” said Kim Prendergast, RD, MPP, Feeding America. “This toolkit provides important information about food insecurity and contains a road map for how clinicians can implement screening and referral practices into their own workflow. By working with community partners that are willing to assist patients toward better health, health care providers are better able to care for patients each time they come in for a visit.”

The toolkit is designed to:

  • Define food insecurity and its impact on health
  • Provide information on how to screen for food insecurity and have the associated dialogue with patients
  • Provide information on programs available to patients
  • Explain how to work with the local food bank and other community organizations, and how to provide a referral to patients
  • Show how to measure the success of food insecurity interventions

The combination of an unhealthy diet and food insecurity can lead to impaired growth in children, more chronic diseases for adults, higher healthcare costs and missed work days, leading to lower incomes. The toolkit notes that food insecurity is linked specifically to these health problems in adults:

  • Higher levels of chronic disease, such as diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease (CHD), hepatitis, stroke, cancer, asthma, arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD)
  • Medication non-adherence
  • Poor diabetes self-management
  • Higher probability of mental health issues, such as depression
  • Higher rates of iron-deficient anemia• More hospitalizations and longer in-patient stays

As the trusted source of referrals to support good health, physicians and clinicians can help alleviate food insecurity and ensure holistic care.

With simple, validated screening questions, physicians and clinicians can add food insecurity to the clinical dialogue and refer those who need help to community resources. Known collectively as the Hunger Vital Sign™, these two questions enable clinicians to quickly assess the food needs of a patient and their household:

  • “Within the past 12 months we worried whether our food would run out before we got money to buy more.” Was that often true, sometimes true, or never true for you/your household?
  •  “Within the past 12 months the food we bought just didn’t last and we didn’t have money to get more.” Was that often, sometimes, or never true for you/your household?

A response of “sometimes true” or “often true” to either or both questions should trigger a referral for food security support.

In addition, health professionals can use the responses to identify and address clinical problems rooted in food insecurity, such as spikes in blood sugar and blood pressure, depression and poor medication adherence.

For more information on Humana’s Bold Goal, click here.

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Bruce BroussardIn a series of LinkedIn Influencer blog posts, Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard shares insights and ideas about the future of health care and discusses the importance of working together to improve the health-care system as well as our own health and well-being. His latest — 3 observations from the hurricanes — is reprinted below. To see all of his blog posts, click here.

The devastating hurricanes that struck Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico challenged our country in ways we have not seen since Katrina made landfall more than 12 years ago. The impacted areas are still rebuilding, and we’re still taking stock of the damage.

Florida and Texas, especially, are Humana country, and the latter is where I went to school years ago. More than 13,000 employees and one million customers were in the path of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. So, a few weeks ago, I went to Miami to understand firsthand the impact that these storms had on our employees, our customers and our operations.

I was proud of how our company responded to the hurricanes, from suspending prior authorizations and referrals to helping impacted members find out-of-network doctors and ensuring them network pricing. Several employees who are nurses volunteered for the state of Florida, which was experiencing a nursing shortage.

During my visit, I drove around with one of our local physician leaders, stopping by a number of Humana sites and the Red Cross. Some of my observations from the hurricanes:

 

Connectivity is everything – The American Red Cross is a great organization that’s served the needs of tens of millions of Americans. We drove to a shelter to talk with people and to see how they’re coping.

While the shelter reflected a wide variety of people from all walks of life, there was one thing in common: everyone was on their phone or tablet. I thought about the connectivity issues experienced during Hurricane Katrina, when smart phones did not exist, and realized that the connectivity apparent at just this one shelter showed how far we’ve come.

Food and water, or a charger? – Losing electricity after a hurricane always brings significant challenges. But the lack of mobile or Wi-Fi service appeared to be an even larger problem for some people, a testament to how dependent we are on our mobile devices.

One Miami employee spoke about how, in the past after a hurricane hit, neighbors would look for generators to keep refrigerators running. Today, it was more about charging our devices.

Think differently – Don’t let preconceived notions cloud your judgment. Many people do not see older Americans as avid users of technology, yet many members of this population have embraced their devices. For example, one Red Cross worker shared a story about her 93-year-old dad, who communicated with her via texting because he felt the phone was less dependable.

This story shows how society has changed and how hundreds of millions of Americans, regardless of age, depend on their mobile devices to stay connected, even during a time when some had lost their homes.

 

 

All these observations have a common element: collaboration. Red Cross workers and volunteers were collaborating to solve problems. Neighbors were collaborating to share essentials. The Red Cross worker and her father were collaborating to ensure he was safe and well.

But even with that progress, we’re not done yet. Humana has approximately 800 employees in Puerto Rico, serving more than 120,000 members, and it will be a long time before the island has a sense of normalcy.

The power of collaboration I witnessed during the hurricane recovery efforts is inspiring. I saw Americans of all ages, genders, races and backgrounds coming together to put the needs of others first.

The collaboration displayed after these storms shows that we can accomplish anything when we’re working together for a purpose bigger than ourselves.

 

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HealthLeaders Media recently wrote about Humana’s Bold Goal and the company’s efforts to improve health and well-being and help communities make better use of their own powerful resources.

Dr. Roy Beveridge, Humana’s Chief Medical Officer, noted that members usually stay with Humana for seven to eight years, giving the company a chance to improve their health.

“The more we improve their health, their lives improve. But also, the better it is for us financially,” he told the publication. “We learned years ago that we have these phenomenally, wonderfully aligned interests. The healthier we make our population, the better off we are financially and obviously the better it is for the patient.”

Dr. Beveridge and Pattie Dale Tye, segment vice president at Humana and leader of the Bold Goal initiative, spoke about the importance of local partners.

The article noted that “the Bold Goal program incorporates grocery stores, pharmacies, local governments, gyms, transportation sources, and other factors that can affect an individual’s health.”

Read the full article here.

 

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Humana and the Humana Foundation have presented a $159,000 grant check from the Humana Foundation to CATCH Global Foundation supporting healthy lifestyle, nutrition and fitness programs in Jefferson Parish Schools.

Two hundred Bridgedale Elementary students attended the Sept. 25 presentation in Metairie, Louisiana, along with Jefferson Parish Schools Superintendent Isaac Joseph, members of the Jefferson Parish School board, and other community leaders.

Jefferson Parish Schools were celebrating the success of Phase 1 of the “New Orleans CATCH® Coordinated School Health Initiative,” which has changed the way the school district approaches student fitness and overall health. In Phase 2, the initiative will be expanded to 16 additional elementary schools, thanks to the $159,000 grant.

The eight Phase 1 schools showed a 56 percent increase in time spent being physically active during P.E. class as well as a 23 percent boost in the number of days per week kids reported being moderately to vigorously physically active. The CATCH Program also successfully moved the needle in students’ understanding of the connection between their diet and overall health, which is underscored by a 13 percent increase in self-reported water consumption.

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