seniors

Kathrine Switzer, who is serving as Humana’s health and well-being ambassador by participating in the National Senior Games, was profiled in TIME.com this week. Switzer was the first woman to officially run the Boston Marathon, in 1967, and ran the race again this year at age 70.

She talked to TIME about her 50th anniversary, her upcoming participation in the Senior Games, healthy aging, making fitness a priority, and overcoming stereotypes.

“Switzer, who built a career on challenging gender stereotypes in sports, said she is now focused on tackling ‘the frontier of aging,’” TIME wrote. “She will participate this week in the National Senior Games presented by Humana, a competitive sporting event for men and women over the age of 50 where she plans to run the 10K road race.”

Switzer said, “The biggest tip is to realize you’re never too old, big, slow, unattractive — anything else — to be an athlete because the body always wants to be an athlete, and it will respond to any amount of work in a positive way.”

Read the full story here.

See other Senior Games coverage here:

Costco Connection article featuring 2016 Humana Game Changer Vivian Stancil

KNXV-TV (Phoenix) segment featuring Chris Wallace

WDRB-TV (Louisville) segments featuring Rose Roylo

WTVT-TV (Tampa Bay) segment featuring Robert Rusbosin

Montgomery Community Media article featuring Kathleen Fisken

WNCT-TV (Greenville, NC) segment featuring Fay and Irma Bond

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For a health and well-being company, successfully talking with consumers means keeping their health top of mind, using clear language, fostering a culture of wellness, and letting them know your goals are the same, according to Jody Bilney, Humana’s Chief Consumer Officer.

She spoke recently with Forbes about the challenges and opportunities for healthcare marketers.

“Healthcare is a terrific industry in that it is one of the few where the motives of the company, in this case Humana, are perfectly aligned with the interests of our members,” Jody said. “If we can help our members be healthier, they will be happier, and the healthier our members are, the less it will cost us, and the more we can invest in growth.”

She also said it’s important to communicate clearly, with language that’s not vague or intimidating, and noted Humana’s efforts to update the way the company speaks with members.

“We would use the term ‘drug formulary’ instead of something like ‘list of drugs,’” she said. “Another example, we would say we would ‘investigate that claim’ versus just explaining that we had to ‘look into the claim.’”

Gaining a member’s trust is important if a health plan hopes to promote better choices.

“Your health circumstance is a consequence of decisions that you make every day (how much you move, what you eat, etc.). There is a way that we can help to create a culture that is centered on reminding the consumer about the hundreds of decisions they can make every day,” Jody said.

And she said it’s important to realize that the word “health” doesn’t mean the same to everyone.

“Over 75% of our business is with people 65 and older,” she said. “The definition of health is different among the 65+ cohort. For a Millennial, being ‘healthy’ might mean looking good. For somebody 65+ their definition is ‘to not be unhealthy.’”

The conversation should be around “how important it is to be able to go to a grandchild’s play…or to do their errands. We are focusing on the benefits of good health and helping inspire people to live healthier lives, on their terms.”

Read the full article here.

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Humana’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Roy Beveridge, recently wrote an article for Managed Healthcare Executive advising physicians, clinicians and other health professionals on how to best influence population health.

“The secret can be found in leveraging community resources to address your patient’s health barriers,” Dr Beveridge wrote. “Addressing the social determinants of health that your patients live with every day—such as food insecurity, social isolation, and physical inactivity—will augment your treatment plan.”

He wrote about Humana’s Bold Goal, and the company’s efforts to bring “physicians and community leaders together to overcome barriers to health.” He also offered examples of the work that can be scaled to other communities.

“In our latest Bold Goal Progress Report, we showcase how physicians, nonprofits, faith-based groups, and government and business leaders are coming together to create more Healthy Days,” he wrote. “Because we’ve learned that no one entity, Humana or your practice, can do this alone. It takes us all and we must be aligned.”

Read the full article here.

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Margaret Masters, 94, is the pride of her Zumba class, and she says dancing makes her happy and keeps her healthy.

She’s been a regular visitor to the Humana neighborhood location in Metairie, Louisiana, for a few years, and an active participant in the center’s weekly Zumba class with about 35 other area Humana Medicare members.

“I always liked to dance,” she told the New Orleans Times-Picayune. “It feels so good. I am just blessed and I always keep moving.”

The newspaper wrote: “Although Masters credits her longevity to eating healthy and being active, there is always a spark of exuberance when her favorite song ‘Fireball’ by Pitbull comes on during the Zumba class. ‘The class goes quiet and everyone waits for Pitbull’s song… When Margaret says ‘Fireball’ we all jump up…it is so much fun.’”

Read the full Times-Picayune story here.

WDSU, the New Orleans NBC affiliate, also did a story on her, and you can see that here. That story was picked up by Yahoo!

WWL, the New Orleans CBS affiliate, also aired a feature.

 

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Humana’s Nate Kvamme, Vice President of Wellness Solutions, has written about 5 Wellness Trends to Help Support Happier and Healthier Employees in U.S. News & World Report.

“The newly released 2017 Humana Wellness Trends Report uncovers the five trends that currently have the most impact on employees – both inside and outside the workplace,” he wrote. “Specifically, workers are getting older, more fatigued and increasingly worried about their finances while they rely on mindfulness and emerging technology to help them achieve their desired health.”

Nate wrote about how workplace wellness programs have evolved to help improve employee well-being, productivity and morale.

Read his article here.

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