CSR

The Humana Foundation is investing more than $1.8 million in two San Antonio projects as part of its new Strategic Community Investment work.

The Humana Foundation will invest $1,020,000 and partner with OATS to bring the Senior Planet program to San Antonio and change the way people age by giving seniors free access to internet-connected technology. Courses are delivered in a group setting by professional instructors in Spanish and English in a flagship Senior Planet San Antonio Exploration Center and at least 6 local partner organizations across the city.

Additionally, the Humana Foundation will invest $833,000 in partnership with the San Antonio Food Bank creating the Senior Wellness Intervention Model (SWIM). The SWIM program will provide seniors who screen positive for food insecurity with comprehensive services that stabilize their household and address prevalent health issues. Clinics and other health partners will make referrals to the Food Bank, which will pair the participant with a personal Nutrition Navigator who will provide locally sourced produce and supplemental food boxes to address the immediate needs of food insecurity. The Nutrition Navigators will also connect seniors with federal programs, nutrition education and wrap around services for their long-term needs, including transportation to Saturday Senior’s Day, an expansion of the monthly farmer’s market at the San Antonio Food Bank.

The two investments are part of the Foundation’s new Strategic Community Investments work. Through the program, the Foundation will invest $7 million in 2018 in nonprofit organizations operating in seven communities: San Antonio, Texas; Louisville, Ky., Baton Rouge, La.; Knoxville, Tenn.; Tampa Bay, Fla.; Jacksonville, Fla.; and Broward County, Fla.

In each of these communities, Humana is pursuing its “Bold Goal” to improve the health of the communities Humana serves 20 percent by 2020.The Humana Foundation is investing in nonprofit organizations that address food security, social connection, post-secondary success (sustained employment), and asset security, four social determinants of health that significantly impact people’s overall health and well-being. Social determinants are the conditions under which people are born, grow, live, work and age that impact overall health and well-being.

About the Humana Foundation
The Humana Foundation was established in 1981 as the philanthropic arm of Humana Inc., one of the nation’s leading health and well-being companies. Located in Louisville, Ky., the Foundation seeks to co-create communities where leadership, culture, and systems work to improve and sustain positive health outcomes. For more information, visit humanafoundation.org.

Humana and the Humana Foundation are dedicated to Corporate Social Responsibility. Our goal is to ensure that every business decision we make reflects our commitment to improving the health and well-being of our members, our employees, the communities we serve, and our planet.

About OATS
OATS is a social impact technology organization that builds sustainable new systems to change the way people age. They partner with government agencies, community-based organizations, national advocacy groups, and major corporations to engineer solutions that put technology in the hands of older adults to achieve meaningful outcomes, including improving their health, social engagement, finances, learning, and creative expression.

About the San Antonio Food Bank
Founded in 1980, the San Antonio Food Bank serves 58,000 individuals a week in a 16 county service area, one of the largest in Texas. Their strategy is to provide:
• Food for today, by providing emergency assistance is available to any person(s) who walk through their doors;
• Food for tomorrow, by helping clients access resources they need to stabilize their lives going forward, through their benefits assistance center, job training programs, and other resources;
• Food for a lifetime, by providing nutrition, health, wellness, and agricultural programs that take a holistic approach to nourishment.
San Antonio Food Bank is often referenced by name by other large food banks as being best-in-class. They have pioneered programs and shared best practices across the Feeding America network, enabling other communities to adopt and adapt their innovations.

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The Humana Foundation is investing $720,000 in the Geaux Get Healthy program and partnering with Healthy BR to fight food insecurity and social isolation.

The Geaux Get Healthy project will make the greatest impact in Baton Rouge zip codes with high rates of food insecurity and social isolation by offering:

   • Numerous access points for purchasing fresh food at an affordable price
   • Mechanisms for sustaining that access through urban agriculture
   • Education and hands-on demonstrations and tastings to increase consumption of fresh food
   • Opportunities to connect with other members of the community in a way that is meaningful and supportive

In total, Geaux Get Healthy will receive more than $1 million to address Baton Rouge food deserts, thanks to funding from the Humana Foundation and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana Foundation.

The investment is part of the Foundation’s new Strategic Community Investments work. Through the program, the Foundation will invest $7 million in 2018 in nonprofit organizations operating in seven communities: San Antonio, Texas; Louisville, Ky., Baton Rouge, La.; Knoxville, Tenn.; Tampa Bay, Fla.; Jacksonville, Fla.; and Broward County, Fla.

In each of these communities, Humana is pursuing its “Bold Goal” to improve the health of the communities Humana serves 20 percent by 2020.The Humana Foundation is investing in nonprofit organizations that address food security, social connection, post-secondary success (sustained employment) and asset security, four social determinants of health that significantly impact people’s overall health and well-being. Social determinants are the conditions under which people are born, grow, live, work and age that impact overall health and well-being.

About the Humana Foundation
The Humana Foundation was established in 1981 as the philanthropic arm of Humana Inc., one of the nation’s leading health and well-being companies. Located in Louisville, Ky., the Foundation seeks to co-create communities where leadership, culture, and systems work to improve and sustain positive health outcomes. For more information, visit humanafoundation.org.

Humana and the Humana Foundation are dedicated to Corporate Social Responsibility. Our goal is to ensure that every business decision we make reflects our commitment to improving the health and well-being of our members, our employees, the communities we serve, and our planet.

About Healthy BR
HealthyBR brings together more than 90 hospitals, non-profit organizations, local businesses, schools, and governmental institutions that collaborate to significantly impact Baton Rouge’s health priorities. Their success in bringing together key stakeholders to work toward common goals designed to make Baton Rouge a healthier city for all is a shining example of population health management. HealthyBR serves as a best practice model for other cities, has been recognized with the American Hospital Association’s prestigious NOVA award, and participates in the National League of Cities’ Learning Collaborative on Health Disparities. Visit www.healthybr.com to learn more.

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Maria Hughes, Chief Inclusion & Diversity Officer, Humana Inc.

Today’s workplace includes more generations than ever before – the Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, Millennials and Generation Zers together within a single company. As some workers choose to remain in the workforce and delay retirement, the next generation is beginning their careers.

How do we create a healthy and inclusive workplace where employees from every generation feel valued? How do we encourage employees from different generations to work together and share their unique skills? How do we make sure generational differences and commonalities are understood and valued … and a strength, even, as opposed to a weakness?

Quite simply, we listen.

Humana recently created our ninth Network Resource Group (NRG) with the goal of listening to and encouraging teamwork between the different generations within our company. GenUs, our multigenerational NRG open to all Humana employees, is committed to growing understanding and breaking down generational barriers that suppress diversity of thought. When we weave these generations together within Humana – when we truly thrive together – we’re a stronger company better positioned to deliver on our Bold Goal and improve the health of every community we serve.

Finding ways to thrive together regardless of generation is something we work toward across all of Humana. To that extent, our GenUs executive sponsors represent different teams within the company and bring unique perspectives from their own departments and generations.

“I’m excited by the opportunity to help Humana look past stereotypes and listen to each other so that good work gets done efficiently and humanely,” says Walter Woods, Chief Executive Officer of the Humana Foundation and GenUs executive sponsor. “Are workers today really so different from those of generations past? Perhaps, but perhaps we’re responding to shifts in the business landscape by clinging to assumptions and falsehoods. Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, Millenials, the Gen Z up-and-comers – we all want the same things like income, purpose and to feel valued, even if we want them in slightly different ways.”

Today’s workplace is markedly different than in the past, underscoring the importance of thinking differently about our future workforce. Before establishing GenUs, we completed a round of multigenerational focus groups to understand the needs of Humana’s employees. Our employees want and value similar things, as Walter said, but approach these areas differently based on generation.

• Learning and development – Regardless of place in career or life stage, our employees want continued development. Employees are interested in learning from each other, sharing an older generation’s acquired skills with a younger generation and sharing the newer skillsets those just entering the workforce have with those further into their careers.

• Career navigation – Regardless of age, our employees want to continue to grow and want to be taken seriously.

• Workplace experience – It’s important to find the common denominators and create an inclusive space that’s as friendly to those who began their careers without the Internet to those who think email is an “old school” form of communication.

• Consumer experience and integrated care – Our employees want to understand how working well together across generations impacts Humana’s members’ health and well-being.

Values and experiences are what define a generation, perhaps even more so than birth year. Moments like the Civil Rights Movement or 9-11 can shape an entire generation. And generations translate into the workplace and our communication styles, ability to adapt to change and technical skills.

“With a multi-generational workforce, it is crucial that we recognize and listen to differences in workstyle preferences, work location preferences and work hour preferences – that we meet our people where they are in life,” says Anne-Britton Arnett, Vice President, Information Management and Analytics and GenUs executive sponsor. “GenUs gives Humana employees at all stages in life an opportunity to collaborate and make a real difference in how we work toward achieving a work-life balance that allows us all to achieve our best health and well-being.”

As we’ve just started the new GenUs Network Resource Group, we aren’t sure yet what our employees will think of it, or even if they’ll embrace this approach. We are sure, though, that every employee across the company has the opportunity to benefit from greater connection and understanding across our generations.

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At Humana, one way we improve the health of our communities is by thriving together with our health care partners.

Iora Primary Care, a Humana health care partner, focuses on providing primary care designed specifically for the needs of people 65 and older on Medicare. The staff at each Iora location takes the time to understand their patient’s needs, addressing health care holistically and demonstrating a strong, healthy commitment to overcoming health barriers.

Humana recently released its 2016-2017 Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Report, detailing our efforts to be a good corporate citizen. To bring our Healthy People, Healthy Planet, Healthy Performance pillars to life, we created a series of videos highlighting our CSR work to improve health and well-being.

In this video, Dr. Miki Crane, the Practice Medical Director at a Tucson, Arizona, location, explains Iora’s approach to health care and how Iora’s partnership with Humana shapes the level of care she’s able to give her patients. Humana’s health care partners like Iora demonstrate a healthy commitment to supporting local communities along their well-being journey.

We want to hear from you! What’s your healthy commitment? Post on social media, tagging Humana and telling us about your healthy commitment. And, please share this video featuring Iora’s Dr. Miki Crane.

To learn more about Humana’s CSR efforts, read the 2016-2017 CSR Report.

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Humana — the official corporate sponsor of the Rolling Thunder Run for the second consecutive year — honored veterans throughout the Memorial Day weekend event. Activities recognized the service and sacrifices of Vietnam veterans and officially welcomed these brave individuals home.

This video captured the event.

Humana also kicked off a community-wide food drive with Feeding America during Rolling Thunder, which is the largest gathering of military retirees, veterans, active duty military and Vietnam veterans. The public was encouraged to drop off non-perishable foods and/or make a financial contribution at the Humana tent. Every $1 donated to Feeding America will provide 10 meals to people facing hunger.

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