Inclusion and Diversity

Humana has again been named to The DiversityInc list of Top 50 Companies for Diversity, the most rigorous, data-driven analysis of diversity management practices in corporate America. Humana is No. 42 on the list, up from No. 48 last year.

This extensive annual survey recognizes companies that excel in such areas as hiring, retaining and promoting women, minorities, people with disabilities, LGBTQ and veterans. This year’s competition was improved by adding questions that connect talent programs and workplace practices to desired talent results.

“By fostering an inclusive and welcoming work environment, Humana makes it possible for all employees to give 100 percent effort toward improving the health of our members,” said Humana President and CEO Bruce D. Broussard, who attended the awards ceremony in New York and took part in a panel discussion titled “Male CEOs Having a Candid Conversation About Mentoring Women.” “Inclusion and Diversity is a key business imperative for us … it’s one we celebrate too as it brings growth and innovation, and drives greater empathy and understanding of our members and teammates.” 

Humana also was named the No. 7 company for Philanthropy, No. 15 for Veterans, and No. 22 among Companies for Diversity Councils.

More than 1,800 companies are evaluated for the DiversityInc Top 50 list each year, rated in four key areas of diversity management:

  • Talent Pipeline: workforce breakdown, recruitment, diameter of existing talent, structures
  • Talent Development: employee resource groups, mentoring, philanthropy, movement, fairness
  • Leadership Accountability: responsible for results, personal communications, visibility
  • Supplier Diversity: spend with companies owned by people from underrepresented groups, accountability, support

“Our company is committed to a healthy work environment, where all associates are comfortable and confident being their whole selves,” said Tim Huval, Humana’s Chief Human Resources Officer. “We believe that our workplace should reflect the diversity of the communities we serve. By recognizing the potential in all associates, we will retain the best talent and be the employer of choice.”

The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list is derived exclusively from corporate survey submissions, and there is no cost. To be considered for a spot in the DiversityInc Top 50, a company must score above average in recruitment, talent development, senior leadership commitment and supplier diversity. Companies are evaluated within the context of their own industries.

The list began in 2001, at the same time many corporations were beginning to understand the business value of diversity-management initiatives. Like diversity management itself, the list has evolved significantly and continues to be refined and improved to reflect how rapidly companies are adapting these strategies.

This year’s award dinner was well attended by C-suite executives — including 22 CEOs and 24 CHROs — from 28 industries representing more than 3 million US employees.

A panel discussion featured, from left, DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti, Humana President and CEO
Bruce D. Broussard, SHRM CEO
Johnny C. Taylor Jr., and Clint Wallace,
Head of Human Resources, North America, for Sanofi.
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The Humana stop on the Check Your Blind Spots unconscious bias tour was a huge success, hosting hundreds of associates and advancing our conversation around Inclusion and Diversity.

More than 350 people toured the bus, and 336 people took the I Act On pledge to check their own bias, speak up for others and show up for all. 

“This was an engaging and fun experience,” said Maria Hughes, SVP and Chief Inclusion and Diversity Officer. “It was great to see the strong turnout and hear the buzz among associates as they toured the displays, used the technology, and talked about what they learned. The tour is designed to highlight the biases and blind spots we all have, and to empower all of us to have difficult conversations and learn from one another.”

The bus uses immersive, interactive technologies, including virtual reality and gamification techniques, to expose participants to the nuances of unconscious bias. Elements include:

  • Immerse yourself in virtual reality designed to help you see multiple points of view and learn your blind spots
  • Watch videos and take quizzes explaining the concept of biases that may go unnoticed and ways to work against them
  • Leverage tools that allow you to watch as your reflection fades away to reveal a different person staring back at you

“Our associates come from all different walks of life, all different values, different areas,” said Derrick Carr, a Supervisor in Billing & Enrollment, who toured the bus. “So it’s very important for me to be a part of this to make sure that my blinders are not on and that I’m looking at every side of every angle. Inclusion and Diversity is a strong part of what Humana is trying to do.”

The day’s activities also included information booths for the 9 Network Resource Groups (NRGs) as well as Louisville’s Local Inclusion & Diversity Council. All associates are welcome to join, learn, and serve as advocates for the NRGs

The Check Your Blind Spots tour was created by CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion, the largest CEO-driven business commitment to improve diversity and inclusion within the workplace in the country. Humana is a proud signatory of the CEO Action coalition.

To read more about the tour, and to sign the I Act On pledge, click here.

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Humana has earned a perfect score of 100 in the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s 2019 Corporate Equality Index, the national benchmarking tool on corporate policies and practices pertinent to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer employees. This is the sixth time Humana has received the honor.

The distinction puts Humana among the “Best Places to Work for LGBTQ Equality.”

The CEI rating has four key pillars:

  • Non-discrimination policies across business entities
  • Equitable benefits for LGBTQ workers and their families
  • Internal education and accountability metrics to promote LGBTQ inclusion
  • Public commitment to LGBTQ equality

“We’re proud of our culture of inclusion,” said Maria Hughes, Senior Vice President and Chief Inclusion and Diversity Officer at Humana. “We’re committed to a healthy work environment, where all associates are comfortable and confident being their whole selves. By fostering an affirming work environment, Humana makes it possible for all associates — including our LGBTQ colleagues — to give 100 percent of their efforts at work as we create innovative and strategic answers to solve the challenges of health care.”

Humana’s leaders are advocates and allies for all associates. President and CEO Bruce Broussard chairs the company’s Executive I&D Council. Humana’s Pride Network Resource Group (NRG) is committed to helping shape an inclusive world – in and outside of Humana.

Pride is a voluntary, self-driven group of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Ally associates from across the organization. The group’s mission is this:  Through influence and inspiration, we aim to support personal well-being so that people can live life fully by being who they are.

That commitment to inclusion translates directly to healthier members and healthier communities. By leveraging associate insights, Humana creates personalized experiences that make it easier for people to achieve their best health.

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Maria Hughes, Humana Senior Vice President and Chief Inclusion & Diversity Officer, has been included on the Black Enterprise list of the 2019 Most Powerful Women in Corporate Diversity.

This prestigious list – featuring only 45 women – appears in the magazine’s First Quarter 2019 issue. Read more in this news release.

Earl “Butch” Graves, Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer of Black Enterprise, called the list an “exclusive roster of the highest-ranking, most influential African American female executives at some of the nation’s largest companies.”

He said it would be “an essential listing for our readers; one that identifies women who are vital to the management of major corporations, from marketing and talent development to procurement spending and financial performance.”

“We’re proud of Maria and her team and the way they cultivate our vibrant culture at Humana,” said Tim Huval, Chief Human Resources Officer. “Inclusion and Diversity drives innovation and thought leadership at our company, meaning everyone is encouraged to speak up and be heard. We reflect our communities, which allows us to connect with our members and provide the best care possible.”

Black Enterprise (BE) “is the premier business, investing, and wealth-building resource for African Americans. Since 1970, BE has provided essential business information and advice to professionals, corporate executives, entrepreneurs, and decision makers.”

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Louisville is among cities harnessing the collective power of community-based organizations, local government, and nonprofits to become a more equitable place where everyone can thrive.

Two Metro Louisville government leaders driving these efforts were guest speakers for Humana’s celebration of the life and legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. This year’s theme: Unity in Community.

Maria Hughes, Humana SVP and Chief Inclusion and Diversity Officer, with Mayor Greg Fischer at the Lean Into Louisville kickoff event.

Kellie Watson, Louisville’s first Chief Equity Officer, and the Rev. Dr. Vincent James Sr., the city’s first Chief of Community Building, discussed the state of our nation and the city of Louisville. The speakers also highlighted Humana’s partnership with Lean Into Louisville, a city-wide effort that will provide an unprecedented series of presentations, conversations, activities, and art exhibits to explore and confront the city’s legacy of discrimination and inequality.

Ms. Watson provides strategic, visionary planning and oversight to advance racial equity throughout Louisville Metro Government. She oversees the Departments of Human Resources and the Human Relations Commission.

Watson is leading the city on an “equity journey,” joining national partners and other cities to learn how government can make a difference. A top goal: Rooting out structural racism, institutional racism, and implicit bias. This requires raising awareness, investing in marginalized communities, and helping people navigate difficult terrain together.

She shared a startling fact about how black income continues to lag behind white income: “Black wealth is at $5.04 for every $100 that a white family has. That’s $5 for every $100. Those are the inequities that government helps perpetuate that we need to fix.”

“How does government break down the institutional barriers around racism?” she asked. “How does government break down those systems that continue to perpetuate the barriers that keep people from reaching their full potential? And as we all know, government has perpetuated a lot of those barriers throughout history.”

“Governments,” she observed, “must be intentional about fixing such things.”

Each Louisville Metro Government department now has a “racial equity liaison.” These high-ranking leaders have authority to represent issues effectively within their areas.

To evaluate proposed policy changes, Ms. Watson and her team use a “racial equity toolkit.” It provides questions to help define desired outcomes, highlight relevant data, and identify community stakeholders so they are represented.

There were 8,500 victims of hate crimes in the United States in 2017. Ms. Watson gave a powerful, personal account of Louisville’s efforts to reduce these crimes, noting that recently she and her family have been victims.

Rev. James also spoke about being called to serve, saying he was horrified and inspired to act after a triple homicide near his church. He arrived at the scene to find two young people whom he had mentored among the dead.

“I said I never wanted to see another young person die in our streets,” he said. “I asked what would happen to them if I don’t help. I volunteered for everything.”

James left his corporate career to become Chief of Community Building. He focuses on the city’s comprehensive public safety strategy, supervising departments including the Office for Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods, Public Health & Wellness, Youth Detention Services, the Louisville Zoo, and Parks & Recreation.

He serves as the Faith and Community Based Coordinator in the Office for Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods, which works to address the root causes of violence through community engagement and programs such as Pivot to Peace and mentorship.

James is also pastor of Elim Baptist Church in Louisville’s Parkland neighborhood, and he has been involved in multiple non-profit community-building initiatives.

He said the work that he, Watson, and Mayor Greg Fischer are doing is “helping us understand how we got here, that we didn’t just arrive at this point in time in our country, but it was through systems and government policies and individuals who wanted to keep things the way they were without allowing others to have full access to opportunities. Years and years of divesting from our communities have led to what we see.”

The goal, he said, is to bring equity to all communities.

“Why is it that if you lived in one zip code versus another, there is a 12-year lifespan gap?” he asked. “That’s injustice.”

“When you give people jobs and hope, and they have the opportunity to receive an education, it changes history. That’s the work that we’re in. We’re in the people-changing business.”

After a Q&A session with associates, Maria Hughes, Chief Inclusion and Diversity Officer, closed the session with a quote from Dr. King: “We must accept finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope.”

Learn more about Lean Into Louisville. Learning opportunities will be available throughout Louisville.

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