Medicare Advantage

Spending time outdoors can be good for your health, offering everything from improved cognitive performance to decreased stress levels, according to Will Shafroth, President and CEO of the National Park Foundation, and Dr. Roy Beveridge, Humana’s Chief Medical Officer.

Next Avenue recently published a conversation between the two as they discussed the physical and mental benefits of visiting national parks and enjoying their natural beauty.

“Healthy recreation like walking, biking or playing is associated with physical, mental and spiritual health, as well as social well-being,” Dr. Beveridge said. “There is also evidence to suggest that exposure to natural environments could have a variety of positive health benefits.

“Natural environments affect human health and well-being both directly and indirectly, according to the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Environmental Science,” he wrote. “Urban green and outdoor areas provide opportunities for stress recovery and physical activity, in addition to offering spaces for social interactions, which are vital for mental health.

“Chronic stress, physical inactivity and lack of social cohesion are three major risk factors in people with poor health, and therefore exposure to abundant greenery and outdoor environments is an important asset for health promotion.”

The two noted that Humana and the National Park Foundation partnered with Florida International University and MetCare medical practices to introduce a Park Rx program that gave physicians and other care providers the ability to “prescribe” park activity to their patients. Analyzing the results showed that the program fostered better health and well-being by inspiring people to head outdoors.

“We need to make it easy for physicians to treat their patients, and not only with the necessary pharmaceuticals,” Dr Beveridge said. “We need to prescribe resources that engage patients in healthy activities that can lead to better lifestyle decisions and ultimately healthy behavior change. Physical activity is vital to achieving better health, and it’s up to us to make it easy for physicians to make those recommendations to their patients.”

Read the full conversation here.

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The medical community could improve the well-being of millions of older Americans by addressing how three social determinants of health – food insecurity, loneliness, and social isolation – are prohibiting them from achieving their best health, according to Dr. Roy Beveridge, Humana’s Chief Medical Officer.

Dr. Beveridge wrote a blog post for Forbes titled “Are Social Determinants The Missing Key To Improving Health?” He noted that such social determinants of health may be as important as our physical determinants and genetic makeup. And he cited research showing that “consumer behavior (social connectedness), socioeconomic (family and social support) and environmental factors account for 60 percent of what determines a person’s health.”

“Social determinants are creating a more complex health picture for the people they impact, and we need to address them and find solutions,” he wrote. “To do so, it’s important to understand how social determinants differ from clinical diseases and how they impact specific individuals.

“If you’re food insecure, you won’t be healthy. If you’re lonely, you don’t take care of yourself. If you’re isolated, you’re going to eventually become depressed. Social determinants can lower a person’s resolve to make important lifestyle changes, directly impacting his or her health.”

He said the medical community “needs the time, tools and reimbursement to proactively screen for social determinants of health, and this requires evolved payment models that codify and compensate physicians for these screenings. Creative solutions must be developed to seamlessly and effortlessly connect physicians with community resources as part of the patient’s care plan. Feedback mechanisms are critical so physicians know their patients are using these resources.”

He also noted that, “We have a responsibility to expand our understanding of how risk factors like food insecurity, loneliness, and social isolation affect chronic conditions and then work to evolve the ways in which we address them. … As we think of clinical contributors to health, social determinants of health must become equally as important.”

Read the entire blog post here.

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Mary Lou Griffin, a great-grandmother from Olathe, Kansas, is achieving her best health with the help of Partners in Primary Care.

Recently, Griffin went skydiving to celebrate her upcoming 84th birthday. At Glider Sports in Clinton, Missouri, she completed a tandem jump as the sun set on the western Missouri town.

A KCTV5 segment credits Partners in Primary Care in the footage, and Griffin’s story was shared online at KCTV5.com. KCTV included a brief write-up and mentioned that, “Thanks to the medical team at the Partners in Primary Care Center, Mary Lou has her medical conditions all under control, including diabetes, congestive heart failure and arthritis.”

You can check it out here.

Mary Lou was one of the first patients at Partners in Primary Care in Kansas City, and she is well-known and loved by the staff at the Olathe location.

Partners in Primary Care, a subsidiary of Humana, currently has four locations in the Kansas City area and a total of 9 across the country. Each location specializes in providing senior-focused primary care to members of Medicare Advantage health plans.

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Forbes.com has taken note of Humana’s Bold Goal progress and the importance of addressing social determinants of health to improve well-being.

“A project by health insurer Humana to measure the health of Medicare beneficiaries by asking two simple questions about mental and physical health made progress last year in four of seven cities across the country,” the Forbes story noted. “Humana’s ‘Bold Goal’ initiative uses measures established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to track an individual’s physical and mental ‘unhealthy days’ over a 30-day period.”

The story cited the 2018 Bold Goal Progress Report, which found that “Of our original seven Bold Goal communities, Humana Medicare members in Knoxville, Baton Rouge, New Orleans and San Antonio all had improved Healthy Days as well as improved clinical outcomes. Louisville, Tampa Bay and Broward County, Florida saw increases in unhealthy days, but also experienced slight improvements in clinical outcomes and in Healthy Days in Humana seniors living with conditions such as COPD, diabetes and depression.”

The story also noted that “the effort takes time and involves addressing social determinants of health going into communities with town hall meetings and addressing issues like ‘food insecurity’ or whether residents are isolated with mental illness. In the report, Humana describes social determinants as ‘conditions in the places where people live, learn, work and play (that) affect a wide range of health risks and outcomes.’”

Read the full story here.

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Bruce BroussardIn a series of LinkedIn Influencer blog posts, Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard shares insights and ideas about the future of health care and discusses the importance of working together to improve the health-care system as well as our own health and well-being. His latest — Is a Positive Nudge Better than Fear? — is reprinted below. To see all of his blog posts, click here.

Fear is used to influence how we behave, how we shop, how we save, what we eat, how much we exercise. From purchasing the safest car to baby-proofing our homes, fear drives us in many ways.

But is fear effective in health? Yes, people will lose weight because they’re afraid of having a heart attack. Yet others will lose weight because they want to have more energy to do the things they love and have a longer, more fulfilling life. When it comes to changing behaviors, is fear the best motivator?

In health care, our ability to change unhealthy behaviors – and thus improve outcomes and lower costs – will determine the sustainability of the system. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “86 percent of the nation’s $2.7 trillion annual health care expenditures are for people with chronic and mental health conditions.”

Chronic conditions are the most preventable of health issues because they’re the result of unhealthy decisions made over time. This leads to a question: How do you “nudge” people toward positive behavior change?

I recently finished the revised and expanded edition of a book called Nudge, by Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein. The authors offer several insights on how unhealthy behaviors can be corrected.

Here are four concepts from the book that grabbed my attention and how each can be used to change unhealthy behaviors among seniors and those living with multiple chronic conditions:

#1: Frame the choice without the negative. Thaler and Sunstein examine how a person with a serious heart disease is presented with a “grueling operation.” They state the following:

“The doctor says, ‘of one hundred patients who have this operation, ninety are alive after five years.’ What will you do? If we fill in the facts in a certain way, the doctor’s statement will be pretty comforting, and you’ll probably have the operation. But suppose the doctor frames his answer in a somewhat different way…‘Of one hundred patients who have this operation, ten are dead after five years.’” Thaler and Sunstein go on to say, “If you’re like most people, the doctor’s statement will sound pretty alarming, and you might not have the operation.” The same goes for doctors themselves. “When doctors are told that ‘ninety of one hundred are alive,’ they are more likely to recommend the operation than if told that ‘ten of one hundred are dead.’”

The Nudge: Physicians, nurses, care professionals and caregivers who care for seniors living with multiple chronic conditions have much influence. It’s natural for a senior not to want to undergo an operation where there is risk. Thaler and Sunstein note that “a good way to increase people’s fear of a bad outcome is to remind them of a related incident in which things went wrong; a good way to increase people’s confidence is to remind them of a similar situation in which everything worked out for the best.” Nudges that frame the positives, while highlighting the ideal outcome, will help people take steps to evolve from unhealthy behaviors.

#2: Don’t underestimate the power of priming. Referred to by the authors as “the somewhat mysterious workings of the Automatic System of the brain,” the concept has been proven to show that “subtle influences can increase the ease with which certain information comes to mind.” The authors write:

“With respect to health-related behavior, significant changes have been produced by measuring people’s intentions. If people are asked how often they expect to floss their teeth in the next week, they floss more. If people are asked whether they intend to consume fatty foods in the next week, they consume less in the way of fatty foods. The nudge provided by asking people what they intend to do can be accentuated by asking them when and how they plan to do it.”

The Nudge: Consistent patient engagement is essential, especially when focused on sustaining behavior change. Physicians don’t have a lot of time outside the office for helping patients make better daily decisions. But by nudging the patient, the care team shows an active interest in the patient’s health and can improve outcomes.

#3: Incentives are a better option than talking down to someone. Thaler and Sunstein describe how a simple nudge can lower the teen pregnancy rate, saying teenage mothers “often become pregnant again within a year or two.”

The two cite a “dollar a day” program, “by which teenage girls with a baby receive a dollar for each day in which they are not pregnant…A dollar a day is a trivial cost to the city, even for a year or two, so the plan’s total cost is extremely low, but the small recurring payment is salient enough to encourage teenage mothers to take steps to avoid getting pregnant again. And because taxpayers end up paying a significant amount for many children born to teenagers, the costs appear to be far less than the benefits.”

The Nudge: Sustaining action requires sustained commitment. For seniors living with chronic diseases like Congestive Heart Failure, where the heart weakens over time, life is already difficult. Positive encouragement, through nudging from the care teams, can help them stay the course.

#4: People can make good decisions when presented with non-biased facts. In the bonus chapter, Thaler and Sunstein discuss how New York City adopted a law requiring fast-food chains to display the caloric intake of each of their foods. The authors applaud the preference of mandating information vs. mandating ingredients.

The Nudge: Many of us have experienced this nudge by reading the information in fast-food restaurants. It’s a powerful influence because it doesn’t pass judgment on an option; it merely states the impact of the decision. Making someone feel guilty for his or her unhealthy decisions over a lifetime won’t change behavior.

For far too long, health in our country has been marketed through fear. Given how unhealthy our country has become, it’s time for a change.

Health is hard, especially for seniors living with multiple chronic conditions, limited financial means, and often limited support from family and friends. We have to avoid talking down to people and painting dire scenarios.

At Humana, we’re responsible for the health and well-being of 14 million Americans; 3.3 million of them are Medicare Advantage members, and many of them are living with chronic conditions. I’ve seen firsthand how a nudge – not fear – from a physician, nurse or other care team member can help a person change behavior for the better.

Let’s build a healthier country with helpful nudges, not fear.

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