value-based care

Dr. Roy Beveridge, Humana’s chief medical officer, writes in Managed Healthcare Executive that “value-based care is proving its worth to both physicians and patients alike through improved care, greater reimbursement levels, and lower cost—delivering on the promise of the right care at the right time at the right cost.”

He notes that physicians in value-based arrangements can expect lower healthcare costs, more shared savings, and a higher percent of the overall healthcare dollar compared to the national average.

Read the full article here, and learn more from Humana’s latest Value-Based Care Report here.

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Humana’s value-based care report has shown how physician practices in value-based agreements are increasing preventive care, improving health outcomes and quality measures, and lowering overall health care costs for Humana Medicare Advantage (MA) members.

This video features a panel discussion of care professionals discussing the report.

Written by physicians, the report details the clinical and economic impact of integrated care delivery, examining patient care and the experience of physicians. The report, which can be accessed here, also details physician progress controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and medication adherence for people with diabetes.

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Forbes has taken note of Humana’s latest Value-Based Care Report, writing about how the shift from fee-for-service medicine to value-based payments for physicians is reducing costs and improving quality of care for seniors in Medicare Advantage plans.

Read the Forbes article here.

“Medical costs were nearly 16% lower for seniors enrolled in Humana Medicare Advantage plans that paid physicians via value-based models in 2017 compared to costs of those in traditional fee-for service Medicare,” Forbes said, citing the study.

“In the value-based approach, insurers reimburse providers for services plus additional pay if they meet quality measures, control costs and improve health outcomes of their patients. The traditional fee-for-service system pays for the volume of care delivered.”

The article quoted Dr. Laura Trunk, Humana medical director of provider development, who wrote in the report: “While we know that all physicians are committed to patient health, those in value-based care agreements have access to additional resources and capabilities to build the infrastructure they need to expand their reach outside the practice. Focusing on prevention and the whole health of their panel population allows physicians and their care teams to work more strategically to improve the care of their patients, thus keeping them home and out of the hospital and emergency room.”

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Dr. Roy Beveridge, Humana’s Chief Medical Officer, recently spoke with The Pulse, a healthcare journal associated with the Wharton Health Care Business Conference. Dr. Beveridge will be speaking at the conference later this month, on a panel titled “The Other 50% of Health: Bending the Health Care Cost Curve via Wellness & Behavioral Economics.”

The pulse noted these key takeaways from their conversation:

• Payment mechanisms will be the driver behind changes in how the healthcare system approaches basic wellness (e.g., diet, exercise, sleep, stress). As we shift towards value-based care, the whole system has more incentives to promote wellness.

• Payers need stability in the populations they are covering so that there is a financial return to investing in wellness. It’s hard to invest a lot of time and money into someone’s long-term wellness if you’re only insuring them for a couple of years.

• Basic social factors, like your ZIP code or education level, can determine a massive part of your health and wellness, and payers need to partner with civic leaders and community organizations to improve the health of socially-disadvantaged communities.

“I practiced medicine for over twenty years, and I recognize that the engagement of the physician is crucially important,” Dr. Beveridge told the publication. “The medical world has switched from the fee-for-service (FFS) mentality to value-based care (VBC), which means that doctors are no longer paid just for a treatment, but for outcomes. This creates a huge change in doctors’ treatment plans for their patients, including a big focus on educating the patient; for example, helping them understand why taking insulin is important. The payment mechanism is driving this behavior change, and this behavior change is making people healthier.”

Read the entire interview here.

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Dr. Roy Beveridge, Humana’s chief medical officer, has again been nominated as one of Modern Healthcare’s 50 Most Influential Physician Executives and Leaders of 2017.

Cast your vote for Dr. Roy Beveridge.
Voting is open through Friday, April 28.

For the second year in a row, Dr. Roy Beveridge is in the running for Modern Healthcare’s 50 Most Influential Physician Executives and Leaders. You can vote for him now by clicking here.

We’re proud of the work Dr. Beveridge does to champion Humana’s Bold Goal and integrated model of health care. He’s been instrumental in working with others to unite physicians, business and government leaders, community organizations, medical associations and academics around population health. The unified group looks at barriers that make health hard and works together to test solutions. Then, Dr. Beveridge, on behalf of the group, shares these solutions and research findings so others in the industry can learn from what we’re doing together to make health a little easier for people.

Check out an article he published last month on Forbes.com that focuses on why investing in improved health and longevity makes financial sense for our business.

About Dr. Roy Beveridge:
Dr. Beveridge is known for his thought leadership on population health, authoring numerous articles on a range of medical topics such as medical oncology, stem cell transplantation, integrated care delivery models and standardization of quality metrics. He is board certified in medical oncology and internal medicine, practicing for more than 20 years. He is a member of many societies, including American Medical Association, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and American Society of Hematology. Previously, he has served on many boards related to medical practice, quality metrics and patient advocacy. He currently serves on Health Care Payment Learning & Action Network guiding committee.

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