Well-being

Humana’s value-based care report has shown how physician practices in value-based agreements are increasing preventive care, improving health outcomes and quality measures, and lowering overall health care costs for Humana Medicare Advantage (MA) members.

This video features a panel discussion of care professionals discussing the report.

Written by physicians, the report details the clinical and economic impact of integrated care delivery, examining patient care and the experience of physicians. The report, which can be accessed here, also details physician progress controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and medication adherence for people with diabetes.

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Humana Inc. has been ranked No. 1 among Health Care Providers for its corporate citizenship, according to Forbes and JUST Capital in their new “JUST 100.” The JUST 100 ranks publicly traded companies in the U.S. based on how they perform against the American public’s definition of just corporate behavior.

Humana ranked No. 1 out of 16 companies in the Health Care Providers category and No. 11 out of 890 companies overall. Humana has topped the Health Care Providers category in the JUST 100 each of the three years Forbes and JUST Capital have produced the rankings.

“At Humana, we’re fortunate to have so many employees who care so much about helping people live healthier lives,” said Bruce Broussard, Humana President and Chief Executive Officer. “This commitment to people’s health is what motivates so much of our work at Humana, and I’m sure it’s the main reason people view our company as a trusted corporate citizen. As we continue to grow the care-delivery part of our business, it means a lot to us to be recognized as America’s most just health care provider.”

The JUST Capital rankings encompass the largest publicly traded companies in the U.S., and are based on one of the most comprehensive surveys ever conducted on public attitudes toward corporate behavior – involving 9,000 American respondents in 2018 and more than 81,000 over the past four years.

“Trust in our institutions is more important than ever right now. The JUST 100 recognizes companies that are doing right within society,” said Forbes Chief Content Officer Randall Lane. “The rankings help companies gauge their progress on benchmarks that go far beyond quarterly earnings.”

To create the JUST 100, Forbes asked survey respondents what they want companies to focus on, and how companies should prioritize the following aspects of business behavior: worker treatment, customer treatment, quality of products, environmental impact, community engagement, job creation, management leadership, and shareholder treatment.

The new JUST 100 List will appear in the December issue of Forbes magazine and is currently available online here.

To learn more about Humana’s corporate citizenship efforts, read the company’s 2016-2017 Corporate Social Responsibility Report, which was published in August 2018.

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Thanks to the generous support of the San Antonio community, the “March Out Hunger” food drive collected close to 94,000 pounds of food to help combat food insecurity in our military and veterans community.

The food drive was hosted by the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the U.S. VFW Texas District 20; Humana, a leading health and well-being company; and the San Antonio Food Bank.

Food insecurity is defined as a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life. In the United States, food insecurity affects 1 in 8 people.

The two-month long food drive aimed to bring awareness to the fact that 1 in 5 households served by a local food bank has at least one member who has served, or is currently serving, in the U.S. military.

“When we think of our military and veteran community, we don’t often think of hunger or food insecurity,” said Bill White, Texas Medicare President for Humana. “As part of our Bold Goal work to make San Antonio 20 percent healthier by 2020, Humana was able to partner the VFW and the San Antonio Food Bank together to impact food insecurity locally. It’s partnerships like this that will help improve the health and well-being of San Antonians.”

The food drive also included a Veterans Resource Fair hosted on Nov. 17 at the San Antonio Food Bank and a rucksack march during the San Antonio Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series on Dec. 2. Rucksack march participants carried 35 pounds of food in a backpack for 1.3 miles to bring awareness to food insecurity.

“At the San Antonio Food Bank, food donations are critical to the ongoing mission of collecting and redistributing food to individual and families who do not know where their next meals are coming from. The veteran population has a definite need and this program is assisting our network of partners to serve 58,000 meals weekly,” said Eric Cooper, President and CEO of the San Antonio Food Bank.

“Earlier this year I was shocked and saddened to discover the impact food insecurity has on America’s veterans, and I knew the VFW had to step up and fight this disheartening injustice,” said VFW National Commander B.J. Lawrence. “No one should be food insecure – especially our veterans – and we’re honored to work alongside Humana and community champions like the San Antonio Food Bank to help do our part in this important initiative.”

Earlier this year, Humana partnered with Feeding America (the national network of regional food banks) to stage a series of events throughout the year that will drive food donations and raise awareness of food insecurity with a focus on helping veterans. In addition, Humana is a national affiliate partner of the VFW.

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The Humana Foundation, philanthropic arm of Humana for the past 37 years, is awarding grants to 30+ nonprofit organizations in Louisville as part of the foundation’s new Community Relations program. The $2 million in grants is in addition to $7 million the Humana Foundation is contributing to other organizations in seven cities, as part of its new Strategic Investing initiative.

The Louisville Community Relations grants – which add up to $2.4 million – will provide opportunities for growth and development of local nonprofits on a programmatic and organizational level, ultimately contributing to health and well-being in Louisville.

“The organizations receiving these new grants from the Humana Foundation all made clear that they will be able to make a difference in the Louisville area with the contributions,” said Walter Woods, CEO of the Humana Foundation. “Quality of life and quality of place programs like those funded by our Community Relations program are key to making our hometown a healthier, safer place to live for everyone.”

The Humana Foundation’s Community Relations program grants seek to improve the quality of life in Louisville by addressing food security, housing, safety or healthcare issues, or make metropolitan Louisville a more appealing place to live by addressing the environment, arts and culture, inclusion and diversity, or equitable access for all.

Of the 30+ Louisville organizations receiving Community Relations grants from the Humana Foundation, the following seven will receive $100,000 grants:

Home of the Innocents will use its grant to help children and young adults experiencing homelessness via its Aftercare Program.

Shawnee Christian Healthcare Center will use its grant to fund comprehensive school-based health centers in high-need neighborhoods, providing medical, dental and counseling services to low-income, medically underserved residents in West Louisville.

Louisville Urban League’s grant will fund the “It Starts With Me” community health program, using trained community health workers to support West Louisville residents.

One West will use its grant for the Invest West Community Revitalization Initiative, bringing commercial development and growth to the nine neighborhoods of West Louisville.

Kentucky Refugee Ministries will use this grant to empower new Louisvillians and educate local providers, focusing on case management for those with complex medical conditions, medical and mental health education for refugee and immigrant community groups, and education and training for medical and mental health providers.
Louisville Metro Health Department will use this grant towards its “Our Money, Our Voice” initiative, which provides residents of Council Districts 6 and 8 with an opportunity to brainstorm ideas that improve the community, develop submitted ideas into project proposals, vote for the best proposals, and fund the winning projects.
Help Us Grow Reading Program will use this grant to support its work to influence second and third graders academically and socially, engaging trained volunteers to use an evidence-based curriculum to raise reading proficiency among Louisville elementary students.

Each of the following nonprofits will also receive a $25,000 or $50,000 Community Relations grant from the Humana Foundation:

2 NOT1 Fatherhood and Families
55,000 Degrees
American Lung Association
Americana Community Center
AMPED
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana
Boys & Girls Club of Kentuckiana
Carnegie Center for Art and History
Community Ventures Corporation
Dare to Care
Have a Heart Foundation
Health Equity Fund
Leadership Louisville Foundation
Louisville Metro Parks Foundation
Louisville Orchestra
Mattingly Center
New Directions Housing Corporation
Peace Education Program
Play Cousins Collective
Saint John Center
Smoketown Family Wellness Center
Stage One Family Theater
Surgery on Sunday Louisville
The Healing Place
Treeslouisville

Skills-based volunteering will also play a role in the Community Relations program. As a result, more Humana employees in Louisville will put their strongest business skills to work for area nonprofits to increase capacity, access and sustainability.

Humana employees in Louisville also participated in the grant-selection process. Their input via an online vote helped determine which organizations are receiving Community Relations program grants.

As part of the $2.4 Million the Humana Foundation is awarding through this program, several other organizations will receive funding from the foundation, including Metro United Way and Fund for the Arts.

“We’re excited about this new Community Relations program, in part because of the high quality of the organizations receiving the grants,” Woods added. “These are organizations that have demonstrated that they not only know how to make Louisville a better place, but they are helping to make that happen every day – especially for the people in our community who need help the most. We have great confidence that these grants will go a long way toward strengthening our city and region.”

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Bruce BroussardIn a series of LinkedIn Influencer blog posts, Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard shares insights and ideas about the future of health care and discusses the importance of working together to improve the health-care system as well as our own health and well-being. His latest — 21st Century Solutions for 20th Century Problems — is reprinted below. To see all of his blog posts, click here.

We all know health care is being transformed: from the emergence of remote, real-time monitoring to the continued adoption of value-based-care payment models, disruptive technologies are improving health care.

Yet despite the progress, health care is facing challenges.

Take demographics, such as population. Each day, 10,000 Americans turn 65, and the number of people over 65 is expected to grow from 46 million today to 98 million by 2060. We’ll need more caregivers, as there are now about 34.2 million people who have provided care to an adult age 50 or older.

Now look at the health of those people. Three in four Americans over the age of 65 are living with multiple chronic conditions. Unlike episodic treatment, caring for those with chronic conditions requires proactive prevention, assistance with lifestyle decisions, and multiple specialists to treat complex, serious diseases such as congestive heart failure, diabetes, etc.

So with more unhealthy people over the age of 65, how do we prepare primary care physicians, nurses, social workers and caregivers to handle this wave of change?

Primary care physicians are the centerpiece

These population and health factors are putting significant demands on nurses, social workers, pharmacists and primary care physicians who assist people living with chronic conditions.

Research has shown growing demand for these key professions. For example, there is a projected shortfall of between 14,800 and 49,300 primary care physicians by 2030.

These demographic and health challenges require the health care system to evolve – away from episodic care and toward holistic health, where the care for a person living with multiple chronic conditions is managed by the primary care physician.

If we’re to help prepare the next generation of health professionals, their education and training must evolve as well. Clinical models that slow disease progression and payment models that incentivize quality and cost savings must be integrated into the system. In addition, daily workflows that allow more time with fewer patients are essential.

Yet it’s not just the clinical. It’s important to partner with local charities and community agencies to address social determinants of health – food insecurity, social isolation and loneliness.

Medical schools are starting to change

Today, a select number of medical schools are evolving their curriculums to help the next generation of clinicians, including primary care physicians, embrace holistic health.

Holistic care is most effective when care is integrated, which occurs when multiple clinicians (e.g., physicians, nurses, pharmacists, social workers and optometrists) are all aligned in a value-based model and working with one another to deliver a better patient experience and better outcomes. We need to build an integrated educational system to care for patients in this value world, and everyone has to work well together to make this a reality.

Recently, Humana and the University of Houston’s newly established College of Medicine announced that we’re going to build the Humana Integrated Health System Sciences Institute at the University of Houston. We’ll train physicians and other clinicians in integrated care delivery through a collaborative partnership with a focus on “advancing population health, improving health outcomes and expanding the use of value-based payment models.”

The new school will also integrate Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy and Social Work. Social workers will be an integral element for taking care of underserved populations because they’re a key link between patients and community resources.

Working, thinking and building differently

Better management of chronic conditions, and addressing the social determinants of health that amplify them, is essential for transforming our health care system.

If we want to help primary care physicians and clinicians, then all entities in health care — universities, industry and government — must band together to advance the science of primary care. We’re moving to a consumer-focused health care system that’s integrated and personalized, and it will improve the health of the people it’s meant to serve.

Advancing care means we have to work differently, think differently and build differently.

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